Below you'll find a few common questions asked of Rare Coins of New Hampshire.  If you're questions are not answered on this page, please feel free to click the Contact Us tab and fill out the contact form at the bottom of the page and we'll gladly get back to you with the best possible answer.

FAQs

Spider FAQ
  • Mailing and/or Returning Items
  • 1. How do I mail or return items to Rare Coins of New Hampshire?

    Instructions for Shipping

    Precious Metals & Numismatics Through

    USPS INSURED/REGISTERED Mail Service

    Please follow these instructions when shipping precious metals or numismatics to us:

    PLEASE CALL OUR OFFICE TO NOTIFY US BEFORE MAILING ANYTHING TO RCNH.

    1.)  Ship precious metals and numismatics via U.S. Postal Service:

    USPS Insured - for values under $1,000.00.

    USPS Registered - for values $1,000.00 and up to $25,000.

    2.)  ONLY SHIP ITEMS TO US IN A BOX!  DO NOT SHIP IN AN ENVELOPE!

    3.) Be sure to include a packing list with: your name, address, phone number and an itemized list of every item in the box.  Please keep a copy of this list for your own records.  Include values, if known.

    4.)  You can use newspaper, bubblepack, or similar packing materials in the box to protect your items.

    5.)  Registered packages require that all of the seams on the box be covered in brown paper tape.  If mailing in a Priority Flat Rate Box, please DO NOT cover the words “Flat Rate” on the box with brown paper tape.

    6.)  Ship packages to:

    R.C.N.H., Inc.

    P.O. Box 720

    Milford, NH 03055

    7.)  Please call your representative when your package has been shipped.  We in turn will call you when your package has arrived.

    Broken Coin Holder

    This was sent in an envelope and even though this was insured, the Post Office won't cover the damages because it wasn't properly packaged.  This is why items should be sent to RCNH in a box.

     Call us at: 1-800-225-7264

  • Bullion Questions
  • 1. I can't find bullion for sale on your website, how do I order?

    Although Rare Coins of New Hampshire does not maintain in-house inventory of bullion products, we are able to acquire them for our clients as need dictates and at very competitive prices. Due to the volatile nature of these markets, we require good funds on hand in the form of cleared check, certified funds, or via wire transfer before we are able to “lock in” a price for you at any given time. Credit cards are not accepted for bullion transactions. Once we have good funds in our possession we are able to purchase for you at your discretion, not ours.

    We ask a very small service charge over our wholesale cost, usually in the amount of 1% for gold and 2% for silver transactions. The only other fee involved is that of the postage cost involved in sending your package to you and varies depending on the weight and value. This charge ranges from $5-25 for most orders, particularly heavy or valuable deliveries may be more. We ship through the U.S. Postal Service and all packages are discreetly marked for purposes of confidentiality and fully insured for safety.

    If you would like to discuss bullion ownership in more detail or to request information on ordering please call us at 800-225-7264 and speak with one of our numismatists who will be glad to answer any questions you may have.

  • 2. Do you offer bullion services?

    Absolutely! Many of our clients utilize gold and silver bullion as a necessary component to their diversified hard asset portfolio. Whether as a hedge against a soft economy, to profit from underlying moves in the price of the metal itself, or just because the coins are beautiful, the reasons for ownership are many.

     

    Our core business focuses on numismatic coins, meaning those whose price is determined by their rarity, condition, and collector demand. A 1916 Standing Liberty Quarter, the key date of the series contains approximately seventy five cents worth of silver yet is usually worth anywhere from $1000 to well over $20,000 depending on its condition. A rare date $20 Saint Gaudens contains just under one ounce of gold and can also be worth many thousands of dollars. Changes in precious metal values have a relatively negligible effect of the prices of such items.

     

    Bullion on the other hand refers to gold, silver and platinum coins or bars whose value is directly tied to the price of the underlying metal they are composed of. If gold fluctuates by $5 on any given day for instance, one ounce gold bullion products will move accordingly. These items are not rare, nor particularly collectable and thus maintain very little premium over their intrinsic value.

     

    The most commonly traded forms of gold bullion are American Gold Eagles which come in coin form and are available in weights of one, half, quarter and tenth ounce denominations. These are 92% pure or 22 carat gold. Usually the smaller the denomination, the higher the premium and thus the less gold you will be getting for your dollar. Smaller denominations however can come in handy for those who may be in need of small change or even as great gift items.

     

    The Canadian Mint produces Maple Leaves which come in the same denominations as the Gold Eagles described above with the primary difference being that they are 99.99% or 24 carat pure gold.

     

    In addition, numerous manufacturers produce gold bullion in bar form, usually in weights of one and ten ounces. It is important to own bars made by widely recognized refiners such as Credit Suisse, Johnson-Matthey or Englehard and that they be a minimum of 99.9% purity.

     

    All of these items are comparably priced with each other in relation to the price of gold, and recently have been hovering at close to $15 over spot. Neither really has an advantage over the other in terms of investment potential, ownership is really just a matter of preference.

     

    The most commonly traded form of silver bullion are American Silver Eagles which are about the size of a silver dollar and contain one ounce of 99.9% pure silver. These are very popular as a form of silver ownership and also make great gift items. There are certain refining and manufacturing costs involved in the production of Silver Eagles which is passed along to the end user, usually resulting in their price running about $1.75 over the spot price of silver.

     

    Various manufacturers also produce silver bullion in bar form, usually in weights of one, ten and one hundred ounces. It is important to own bars made by widely recognized refiners such as Johnson-Matthey or Englehard and that they be a minimum of 99.9% purity. These bars often trade at prices much closer to spot than the Silver Eagles, often just a few cents over as they are treated more as a bulk item and have smaller production costs involved.

     

    Please note, certain marketers send these items to third party certification services whereupon they are encapsulated in a tamper proof holder and assigned a technical grade. These sellers may then offer them at inflated prices while extolling the virtues of these rarities which are now officially bestowed with super high grade designations such as Mint State or Proof-69. Understand that these are not rare, as a matter of fact the vast majority exist in this approximate condition due to strict production standards. It is our opinion that this is a poor form of bullion ownership and that you will be better served by ignoring these products. Except in very rare cases, certifying bullion does not increase the value and any premium paid at the time of purchase will usually be completely lost when it comes time to sell.

     

  • 3. Where can I find the most recent spot prices for gold, silver and platinum?

News

RCNH Monthly Newsletter: October 2017 Issue

Over 200 Years Of Combined Numismatic Experience At Your Disposal.

October 2017 Issue

 

Strive for Those Win-Win Relationships

By Warren Mills
 

Welcome to the October issue.  It seems that people are getting a bit more interested in specific ideas and recommendations.  In this issue, I’ll try to address a few things that have been brought up that I hope you find interesting.
 
This month, I had a chance to examine a collection of coins that included most issues in a specific series from 1801 to 1964.  Wow, what a neat undertaking.  I was asked about my interest in the set and my first question was “from where did you acquire most of the coins?”  When I was told from where they were purchased, I said, “It was not for me!”  I hated to do it, but the source of acquisition was known as a dumping ground for marginal coins.  Imagine that – I couldn’t believe I had to pass. 
 
We try to act as stewards for future collections.  I knew right away the degree of over-grading and commercialism that I would see would be a disappointment to both me and the customer.  He e-mailed and said he really wanted my opinion and hoped I would help him.  If someone needs help, I’m all in and so I said I would examine, critique, and price every coin… which I did.  I described and priced everything:  all the brilliant circulated bust issues, and all the circulated pieces that were graded and were mostly one full grade off.  For six straight hours, I went at it.  I came up with a price of just under $75,000 and said that if the coins were more technical for the grade, I would have easily paid well over $100,000. 
 
One of the coins was certified as AU and I graded it VF.  He said upfront he was going to get other offers; yet, I knew that going in and I told him that was fine.  After a couple of weeks, he e-mailed me and asked if I could stretch almost $3,000.  When I considered the hours of work I would have to dedicate to re-grading, a handful I could send to CAC and what I would accept from PCGS as downgrades, I couldn’t stretch.  I was thankful for his kind consideration and giving me the ability to have the final opportunity.
 
I couldn’t believe I had to say no.  If the collection were solid and original, I would have been stretching probably to $125,000.  Yet, I had to let someone else offer these coins to others.  I know that of the 200+ coins in this collection, I could only offer less than twenty to our list of great clients.  I just couldn’t stand behind the rest.
 
The lesson here is on my part – stick with your gut and be nice.  I could have used those six hours.  On the collectors’ part, establish a relationship with a handful of knowledgeable caring professionals!  Anyone can be an order-filler and take one’s money on commercial fodder.  A dealer that cares about their clients and industry wants to have a great relationship and sell the best coins.  This way, they have a chance to help you get real value for your money and a hopeful opportunity to help you make a profit and sell your coins to other customers that keeps the circle going.  In other words, strive for those win-win relationships!


Lesson Learned!

By Warren Mills  

I tried last month to establish a relationship with a new dealer.  He had some coins that I would have loved to acquire if they met my criteria:  #1 original, #2 no damage, and #3 accurate for the grade.  This dealer is a long time advertiser in many coin publications.  I had never done business with them before.  I called the office the first time and no one called me back.  I just thought the coins were sold.  Next month, the same pieces are in their ad.  I called back and spoke to a nice customer representative and told him I was interested in the entire lot, but only if they were original, undamaged, and graded accurately.  If not, I didn’t want to waste my time and theirs.
 
I was assured all the coins were fine.  Since we hadn’t done business before, he asked if I would send a check in full and they would refund on any pieces I wanted to return.  I gave them references, but I said to myself, “Well, they are Coin World advertisers and I’d love to establish a new relationship,” and so I said “okay.”  I sent a check… they sent the coins.  I was mortified at what I saw!  I tried my best to buy what I could, but I then sent back the rest.  Now beforehand, we agreed on a price for each coin.  When I relayed to them over the phone what I was keeping and returning, the rep said “fine.”  A few days later, they called me and reneged on the pricing because I didn’t keep enough of the coins.  Wow, this stuff is still happening!
 
Renege on your word and misrepresent the product???  I’ll let you know how it works out!  Is it a lack of knowledge, ethics, or both?


Partner and owner of Rare Coins of New Hampshire, Inc. since June, 1990 and a full time coin dealer since 1979.  Warren is a full member of the Professional Numismatists Guild and a life member of the American Numismatic Association.  He was selected by the Rosen Numismatic Advisory as one of the ten leading numismatists in the country for twelve consecutive years.  He was selected by PCGS and written up in their newsletter as handling and submitting some of the nicest coins they have ever seen.


 A Lucky Turn of Events 

By Dave Carleton
 
I want to make a brief comment on an observation I made earlier this month.

 A client came in to our office toward the middle of the month. I thought I recognized her and when she reminded me that she had been in here about a year ago, it all came back to me. At that time, she had come in to sell a large assortment of silver-related items --silver rounds, bars and junk (90% pre-1964 circulated coins). The total came to $75,000 dollars and, as I remember, she said that she was raising funds for a project on which she and her husband were about to embark. This time she had 90 ounces of gold to sell and, again, it was an accumulation of a variety of pieces from 1 oz. rounds to 10 oz. bars.

We figured the assortment for approximately $120,000, but we would have to wait to write the check for another 24 hours until our wholesaler tested the larger bars for authenticity as we don’t have the equipment to test those bars that are 10 oz. or larger. She was a little upset because she was hoping to leave with a check in hand that same day. That’s when she told us that her husband’s job had taken them all around the world for the last several years and that the traveling aspect of the job was winding down and they were looking for a nice quiet town in New Hampshire in which to settle.

She apparently had found a “nice little place” and was anxious to put a substantial down payment on it, and that’s why she was in kind of a rush to get the money from the sale of the gold. She had mentioned earlier that they had been accumulating these hard assets for just this purpose.  I remember thinking that it probably was a pretty small place based on the town she mentioned and the fact that they had about $195,000 to spend.

At one point our conversation focused on timing and how when you need the money, it seems like the market isn’t cooperating. That’s when it was mentioned that perhaps her selling of the silver last year was a bit premature. A big smile came to her face and she said that sometimes things work out for the best in strange ways. She then said, “Thank goodness for Bitcoins.”

I must have shown a strange look as I asked her what she meant. She told me that last year when she sold the silver that her son talked her and her husband into buying $75,000 worth of bitcoins and that they were now worth $280,000. She was going to use these funds and the money from the sale of the gold to buy the new house.

I know that we delivered a good check to her the next day, but I have no idea if she was able to sell her Bitcoins. I hope everything went well and I can’t help thinking that her son must have demonstrated some pretty good salesmanship to get them to dive into the Cryptocurrency market.

I seem to remember being offered bitcoins about 5 or 6 years ago for $15.00 bucks. Who knew? I think I’ll just keep buying silver. I even like the fact that it’s heavy.

Dave


David Carleton, a New Hampshire native was introduced to coin collecting by his father and Grandfather in the 50’s. Gold bullion speculation dominated the 70’s culminating in 1980 when focus on Numismatics returned. He became a life member of the ANA , met Warren Mills  (his coin Guru) and they cofounded RCNH in 1990.


Questions From Our Mail Bag

By Warren Mills
 
R.S. posed an interesting question:  Warren, I enjoy reading the articles in “The Enthusiast,” but when are you going to come out with specific recommendations about what people should buy?
 
Thanks for your question, R.S., and the question hit between the eyes!  Everyone has different time frames for holding and collecting or investing objectives.  It’s hard to know what to say when you don’t know the criteria you are trying to meet.  I will try to give a basic idea to coin purchasing success and I hope it will help.
 
First and foremost, establish a relationship with ethical dealers that have a long standing reputation in the industry.  They will guide and help you not only learn about the coins but also help you avoid pitfalls.  Then, enjoy the pursuit.  Try to buy coins with nice eye-appeal.  I don’t mean that you have to become an expert grader - that’s what your dealer will do for you.  Just learn the difference between original and dipped or enhanced surfaces. 
 
When you’re not sure, CAC is a good protective area to consider allocating funds.  Even though CAC will sticker non-original dipped coins, they will still have meat on the coins and they won’t be totally stripped.  Grey Sheet just had a recent article about commercially graded brilliant Morgan Dollars that are white but are over-graded; rest assured, these coins will pull down the prices on Morgan’s in virtually all grades from MS-63 to MS-67.  Have the right coins and you will weather the storm.
 
Try to acquire coins that are under the radar.  In all series there are undervalued coins.  A good source to determine what is undervalued is to examine pop reports.  Look at the coins from the lowest circulated grades to the highest uncirculated grades.  There are many dates in all series of coins that have not been exposed that are vastly under-valued.  I like Indian Cents, but copper coins have been fully exposed.  There are no secrets.  The same is true for nickel pieces.  Everyone knows how rare certain business strikes are in the Three Cent Nickel series or how rare the True 1880 Shield Nickel is in business strike.  However, these coins are exposed.
 
Examine series of coins that you enjoy!  Seated Half Dimes to Seated Halves have many “P,” “S,” and “O” mint issues that are a joke!  They are rare and unexposed.  The same with gold $2.50, $5, and $10 pieces:  there are many “P,” “S,” and “O” mint coins that are under-valued.  In the silver series, the “CC” and rarest dates are coins to buy with an objective of set completion but not as much for investment.  The same is true for most “CC,” and “C” and “D” mint gold:  these coins are exposed, plus there is rampant over-grading and surface alteration.  Do some homework on the above series and you could be a huge winner!
 
I also believe in diversity.  The specialist that is a die-hard for one series and more interested in investment return may have to wait for years for their ship to come in.  That person may want to collect coins from two or more series that are not exposed.  In addition, key dates are coins about which everyone knows.  Look for the under-valued coins in a series.  You may be able to buy ten or more underexposed coins for the price of one key.
 
I hope this answer helps, and keep those questions coming.
 
Warren Mills
 

 

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