Below you'll find a few common questions asked of Rare Coins of New Hampshire.  If you're questions are not answered on this page, please feel free to click the Contact Us tab and fill out the contact form at the bottom of the page and we'll gladly get back to you with the best possible answer.

FAQs

Spider FAQ
  • Mailing and/or Returning Items
  • 1. How do I mail or return items to Rare Coins of New Hampshire?

    Instructions for Shipping

    Precious Metals & Numismatics Through

    USPS INSURED/REGISTERED Mail Service

    Please follow these instructions when shipping precious metals or numismatics to us:

    PLEASE CALL OUR OFFICE TO NOTIFY US BEFORE MAILING ANYTHING TO RCNH.

    1.)  Ship precious metals and numismatics via U.S. Postal Service:

    USPS Insured - for values under $1,000.00.

    USPS Registered - for values $1,000.00 and up to $25,000.

    2.)  ONLY SHIP ITEMS TO US IN A BOX!  DO NOT SHIP IN AN ENVELOPE!

    3.) Be sure to include a packing list with: your name, address, phone number and an itemized list of every item in the box.  Please keep a copy of this list for your own records.  Include values, if known.

    4.)  You can use newspaper, bubblepack, or similar packing materials in the box to protect your items.

    5.)  Registered packages require that all of the seams on the box be covered in brown paper tape.  If mailing in a Priority Flat Rate Box, please DO NOT cover the words “Flat Rate” on the box with brown paper tape.

    6.)  Ship packages to:

    R.C.N.H., Inc.

    P.O. Box 720

    Milford, NH 03055

    7.)  Please call your representative when your package has been shipped.  We in turn will call you when your package has arrived.

    Broken Coin Holder

    This was sent in an envelope and even though this was insured, the Post Office won't cover the damages because it wasn't properly packaged.  This is why items should be sent to RCNH in a box.

     Call us at: 1-800-225-7264

  • Bullion Questions
  • 1. I can't find bullion for sale on your website, how do I order?

    Although Rare Coins of New Hampshire does not maintain in-house inventory of bullion products, we are able to acquire them for our clients as need dictates and at very competitive prices. Due to the volatile nature of these markets, we require good funds on hand in the form of cleared check, certified funds, or via wire transfer before we are able to “lock in” a price for you at any given time. Credit cards are not accepted for bullion transactions. Once we have good funds in our possession we are able to purchase for you at your discretion, not ours.

    We ask a very small service charge over our wholesale cost, usually in the amount of 1% for gold and 2% for silver transactions. The only other fee involved is that of the postage cost involved in sending your package to you and varies depending on the weight and value. This charge ranges from $5-25 for most orders, particularly heavy or valuable deliveries may be more. We ship through the U.S. Postal Service and all packages are discreetly marked for purposes of confidentiality and fully insured for safety.

    If you would like to discuss bullion ownership in more detail or to request information on ordering please call us at 800-225-7264 and speak with one of our numismatists who will be glad to answer any questions you may have.

  • 2. Do you offer bullion services?

    Absolutely! Many of our clients utilize gold and silver bullion as a necessary component to their diversified hard asset portfolio. Whether as a hedge against a soft economy, to profit from underlying moves in the price of the metal itself, or just because the coins are beautiful, the reasons for ownership are many.

     

    Our core business focuses on numismatic coins, meaning those whose price is determined by their rarity, condition, and collector demand. A 1916 Standing Liberty Quarter, the key date of the series contains approximately seventy five cents worth of silver yet is usually worth anywhere from $1000 to well over $20,000 depending on its condition. A rare date $20 Saint Gaudens contains just under one ounce of gold and can also be worth many thousands of dollars. Changes in precious metal values have a relatively negligible effect of the prices of such items.

     

    Bullion on the other hand refers to gold, silver and platinum coins or bars whose value is directly tied to the price of the underlying metal they are composed of. If gold fluctuates by $5 on any given day for instance, one ounce gold bullion products will move accordingly. These items are not rare, nor particularly collectable and thus maintain very little premium over their intrinsic value.

     

    The most commonly traded forms of gold bullion are American Gold Eagles which come in coin form and are available in weights of one, half, quarter and tenth ounce denominations. These are 92% pure or 22 carat gold. Usually the smaller the denomination, the higher the premium and thus the less gold you will be getting for your dollar. Smaller denominations however can come in handy for those who may be in need of small change or even as great gift items.

     

    The Canadian Mint produces Maple Leaves which come in the same denominations as the Gold Eagles described above with the primary difference being that they are 99.99% or 24 carat pure gold.

     

    In addition, numerous manufacturers produce gold bullion in bar form, usually in weights of one and ten ounces. It is important to own bars made by widely recognized refiners such as Credit Suisse, Johnson-Matthey or Englehard and that they be a minimum of 99.9% purity.

     

    All of these items are comparably priced with each other in relation to the price of gold, and recently have been hovering at close to $15 over spot. Neither really has an advantage over the other in terms of investment potential, ownership is really just a matter of preference.

     

    The most commonly traded form of silver bullion are American Silver Eagles which are about the size of a silver dollar and contain one ounce of 99.9% pure silver. These are very popular as a form of silver ownership and also make great gift items. There are certain refining and manufacturing costs involved in the production of Silver Eagles which is passed along to the end user, usually resulting in their price running about $1.75 over the spot price of silver.

     

    Various manufacturers also produce silver bullion in bar form, usually in weights of one, ten and one hundred ounces. It is important to own bars made by widely recognized refiners such as Johnson-Matthey or Englehard and that they be a minimum of 99.9% purity. These bars often trade at prices much closer to spot than the Silver Eagles, often just a few cents over as they are treated more as a bulk item and have smaller production costs involved.

     

    Please note, certain marketers send these items to third party certification services whereupon they are encapsulated in a tamper proof holder and assigned a technical grade. These sellers may then offer them at inflated prices while extolling the virtues of these rarities which are now officially bestowed with super high grade designations such as Mint State or Proof-69. Understand that these are not rare, as a matter of fact the vast majority exist in this approximate condition due to strict production standards. It is our opinion that this is a poor form of bullion ownership and that you will be better served by ignoring these products. Except in very rare cases, certifying bullion does not increase the value and any premium paid at the time of purchase will usually be completely lost when it comes time to sell.

     

  • 3. Where can I find the most recent spot prices for gold, silver and platinum?

News

RCNH Monthly Newsletter: December 2017 Issue

Over 200 Years Of Combined Numismatic Experience At Your Disposal.

  December 2017 Issue

 

The 2017 Baltimore Show

By Warren Mills

Welcome to the December issue of The Rare Coin Enthusiast.  November was a whirlwind of activity for us.  We are seeing a huge amount of people coming in with coins to sell!  It got to the point that we were overwhelmed.  Alas, most are the usual instances of boxes of proof & mint sets, along with quantities of junk silver.  Very few people are coming in with any scarcer coins and when they do, we recommend that they consider certifying, CACing or holding on to them if they can.  We put a price on everything, but at some point, we feel that really choice material will enter a favorable up cycle again and that now is not the time to sell.  It is true that the base of clients for top quality coins is shrinking due to the aging demographics.  However, there are a handful of new serious buyers coming in with a more educated approach and striving for quality.  One affluent collector has spent over $100 million in a quest to assemble an Eliasberg Collection of top quality US coins in a very short time!  The future for top quality coins may finally be bright again.
 
The recently concluded Baltimore Coin Show was very good.  I was surprised that I saw a better selection of material than I had seen in the last few years.  It is very strange to be in a market where a wonderful 6-figure coin is actually more easily traded than a nice 4-figure or low 5-figure coin.  This really brought home the point that new buyers are not only interested in top quality, but are learning about high-end coins for the grade.  They are getting their education and entering the market with more discretionary income than most buyers have had to allocate in the past.
 
While I was attending the show, I had scheduled time to review clients’ coin collections and critique what they have been buying.  It’s a pleasure to see when the grading lessons are really sinking in.  One of our long standing clients came to me with a box of interesting key and semi-key dates of varied series of US coins.  I went through them all and gave an analysis of each coin.  His grading skills and market feel are now on par with many dealers in the industry.  He wanted to CAC some of his more expensive pieces, so I selected 10 coins and sent them to CAC for him.  I am happy to report that 9 out of 10 stickered!  The best part of it is that he is so appreciative.  We spend hours of time trying to help people with not so much as a thank you, sometimes going over their items for years and years with them.  Either way, it is rewarding for everyone to see when lessons are being learned.
 
I know that I’ve touched on this before, but a glaring example recently raised its ugly head.  We need to be diligent to help others and not fall into coin traps.  Many friends or relatives may not be collectors, but may actually be funding Golden IRAs and not even telling you about it. 
 
One last note, once again we’ve been asked to participate in the Rosen Numismatic Advisory, Crystal Ball Survey.  Maurice selects a panel of knowledgeable numismatists and asks for their opinion on a bunch of pertinent questions.  As one of the 6 participants, I am honored to have the opportunity.  With his permission, I will ask if he minds that we include the survey questions and responses in our next issue.  I hope you find the survey interesting and informative. 


Modern Proof Gold Rip-Off

By Warren Mills

The following is a case that we were alerted to.  Some of you may not know that there is a consumer organization that is lead by John Albanese, called The Numismatic Consumer Alliance.  Its sole purpose is to help people that may have been caught up in a coin scam.  We at RCNH dedicate our time when alerted to these situations to try and help people get some of their money back.  There is no compensation for it, but it is the right thing to do. 
 
As you all may know, the coin and bullion markets haven’t been good for almost 10 years now.  Coming into the end of the 2008, the market was strong with anticipation of continued activity and then came the financial correction.  The rare coin market stopped dead and the mind set for many people was motivated by fear to buy bullion for protection.  Bullion became harder to find and even with higher premiums, did well until 2011 and then began to fall.  We’ve been waiting for a recovery ever since.  Some people became interested in tangibles with no inclination for collecting, but thought for diversity that it made sense.  We are finding that many elderly people have been approached with starting Golden IRAs and to put Modern Proof American Gold Eagle Coins into it.  The problem is that these Proof Gold Eagles are being promoted as numismatic coins and in this instance, a client paid almost double the going rate that they should have paid. Right now, the premium for Proof Gold Eagles has dropped so much that they are about on par with uncirculated ones.  They may actually be a good buy now, but only at the true current market levels. 
 
If you or anyone you know has funded a Golden IRA in the last few years, you may want to take a look at it.  I hope that we can help this person, but it will be a long row to hoe.  In any case, we only recommend funding these IRAs with coins that are priced according to their bullion content.


Partner and owner of Rare Coins of New Hampshire, Inc. since June, 1990 and a full time coin dealer since 1979.  Warren is a full member of the Professional Numismatists Guild and a life member of the American Numismatic Association.  He was selected by the Rosen Numismatic Advisory as one of the ten leading numismatists in the country for twelve consecutive years.  He was selected by PCGS and written up in their newsletter as handling and submitting some of the nicest coins they have ever seen.


Taking The Red Eye

By Dave Carleton

I can’t remember a time when I didn’t have an interest in coins. My grandfather collected them, my dad collected them, and then I collected them with a little help from my dad. The first coin my dad and I found that really set a fire underneath me was in 1959 and it was a 1955 doubled die Lincoln cent.

That first big find was the beginning of my weekly visits to the Souhegan Bank here in Milford, to gather cents to review and to return the rolls I had checked out.  I did this for several years with the constant hope to find that elusive 1909-S VDB or the 1914-D or another 1955 doubled die.  The coin I hoped to find the most was a 1943 copper cent.  I never found any of those dates and I was too broke or cheap to purchase them because I actually thought that I would find them sooner or later. I used to look at pennies until my eyes were bloodshot.

I haven’t sat down to look at thousands or even hundreds of pennies in years, but I’ve observed Warren doing it almost daily for the last thirty years.  He doesn’t just look at Lincoln cents; he looks at everything with a passion.  It’s amazing what he has found, especially in the variety category.

My appreciation for what Warren does was reignited last week when a gentleman came in with a collection he had inherited from his father.  Warren did the evaluation and I believe he paid 2 ½ cents for the Wheat Cents and, as usual, he told the gentleman that when we have time to go through the cents, if we find a better date, we would set it aside and pay a fair price for it. We wrote him a check and he was on his way.

Later on that afternoon, the man came back to our office and asked to speak to me as I was the one who scheduled his first appointment.  When I went out to meet him, it was apparent that he was a bit stressed out.  He told me that he had gone home after coming here and he went on his computer to review Lincoln cent prices because he thought that they would have been worth more than 2 ½ cents. He said that while he was researching the subject, he found that a 1943-D Lincoln cent was worth a ton of money and that there was one in the bag of pennies he brought in. Then he pulled out a sheet of paper with all the dates and quantities of each date and, sure enough, there was a 1943-D listed.

I was immediately excited and told him that if in fact it was in the bag, we would have brought it to his attention when we went through it.  Seeing how he was here and the bag of coins was right where it was left when he walked out, we looked though it. While we were looking, I took the opportunity to tell him of the many ways Lincoln cents have been altered to look like 1943 coppers.  Aside from copper plating a steel cent, I believe the next most common practice of producing a 1943 copper is to alter the 1948 by retooling the 8 into a 3. This is what I suspect we’ll find, but we’ll soon find out.  Wouldn’t you know it; we were down to the last handful of coins when I found a 1948-D with a scratch right through the 8 and it was very easy to see how this man had mistaken the coin for a ’43-D.  He had no idea at the time about such a rarity.

I tried not to be a pessimist, but I did mention several times while we were searching that the coin was probably an error as there are only two known as far as I knew, so when it turned out to be a ’48, he was more prepared for the letdown.  After he left, I had to take an aspirin for the massive headache I had behind my eyes. I couldn’t stop thinking about how many thousands of pennies I looked at years ago and now how only six- or seven-hundred would just about kill me.

This rare situation of me going through hundreds of coins made me appreciate what Warren does almost every day.  I still love coins, but I’m finding out that some aspects of the hobby aren’t as easy as they used to be!  

Dave


David Carleton, a New Hampshire native was introduced to coin collecting by his father and Grandfather in the 50’s. Gold bullion speculation dominated the 70’s culminating in 1980 when focus on Numismatics returned. He became a life member of the ANA , met Warren Mills  (his coin Guru) and they cofounded RCNH in 1990.


Questions From Our Mail Bag

By Warren Mills
 
Dear Mr. Mills,
 
I have acquired coins from many different sources over the years.  Now is my time to cash out.  However, I don’t want to sell for a wholesale price, I want to get a retail price.  Will I get a retail price by consigning my coins to an auction?   - G.F.

 
Wow G.F., this is a great question!  The short answer is no.  That is a big misconception about auctions.  Even the largest auction houses have commissions of 20% and the smaller ones can be up to 30%.  If you deliver a quality consignment and know how to negotiate with a good auction house, you can reduce that commission substantially.  However, if your consignment is of marginal quality, you will get less than what a reputable dealer may pay you.
 
Also, never ever consign bullion coins to an auction.  I’ve seen this happen with certified bullion coins that could be sold to a dealer for around $1,300 per ounce, but the consignor only gets $1,000 to $1,100 per ounce at auction settlement, ouch!  Your best course of action is to consult with a reputable dealer.  They will let you know what to consign and assist you with auction placement and descriptions.  This knowledge is very valuable.  You don’t want nice coins lost in a bulk lot or poorly placed in an internet sale with less exposure.  Then you can find out which coins should be sold outright and which coins should be consigned to get you retail or better prices.
 
Merry Christmas and God’s Blessings,
 
Warren

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