on Wednesday, 05 October 2016 13:35. Posted in News

Over 200 Years Of Combined Numismatic Experience At Your Disposal.

  October 2016 Issue

A Newsletter By:
Rare Coins of New Hampshire's Logo

Thoughts About CAC

By Warren Mills



I am very happy to have the summer behind us.  It’s always a challenge to go through the quiet time for the coin business.  I’m glad customers get in their hard-earned time off and recharge.  Yet, it really puts a wrench into the business we do. 
 
This year, I decided to do something a little differently.  We ramped up our Coin World advertising with two full page ads in August and September.  Both issues surprised us.  The August issue, in particular, was very well received.  Not only did business from the ad exceed expectations, but we had almost 40 new subscribers sign up for our newsletter.  I was very happy to have new customers give us a shot.  The September ad was not as well received, but it came on strong at the end.
 
Something of concern was how little people knew about CAC (Certified Acceptance Corporation) or how some clients thought it was a gimmick of some kind.  I guess newer clients to our company were surprised by how many CAC coins we had in our ad, so they were happy to give us their opinion when we asked what they thought about CAC-approved coins.  The two main questions about CAC were, “why is it necessary?” and if I have coins that are already graded by PCGS or NGC, “why is CAC so reluctant to sticker more certified coins?”

on Wednesday, 31 August 2016 13:29. Posted in News

Over 200 Years Of Combined Numismatic Experience At Your Disposal.

  September 2016 Issue

 

A Newsletter By:
Rare Coins of New Hampshire's Logo

Monthly Or Bimonthly Newsletter?

We Asked And You Responded

By Warren Mills



We asked our customers and friends to give us some feedback on moving the newsletter to an every-other-month publication instead of monthly.  The overwhelming response was to keep it monthly, but to shorten the length a bit.  Others that enjoyed our articles understood that moving it back to every two months was fine with them, but they did not want us to stop writing it.  Some very knowledgeable people wanted us to do it every two weeks, instead of monthly!  I want to give them a hearty thank you for their vote of confidence.

 

The reason behind the polling on our newsletter is because we have a standing office in a bank building, and we do free appraisals for anyone that wants to make an appointment.  This usually means that we have as many as ten daily appointments with those who have a collection. 

 

We also buy jewelry plus we buy and sell bullion products.  With a markup over cost of 1% on gold and 2% on silver, we are fairly busy for many reasons.  We also try to explain all the in’s and out’s of the coin or bullion market to anyone that requests our guidance.  We love the hobby, so we take the time to go the extra mile.  Unfortunately, time demands can be tremendous.  July and August are also big vacation months, and with multiple people out of the office for two weeks at a time, the time demand is exacerbated.  When you’re the chief cook and bottle washer, it’s hard to keep up with everything.

on Tuesday, 05 July 2016 13:31. Posted in News

Over 200 Years Of Combined Numismatic Experience At Your Disposal.

  July 2016 Issue

A Newsletter By:

 

My Coin Journey Part XIII

By Warren Mills



We found ourselves with our backs against the wall.  I knew it was time to start a company.  I’d had enough of working for individuals that had different perspectives and objectives than mine or my customers.  Often, what I believed was the most honorable thing to do was met with incredible resistance.  I always believed that if you protect and preserve the interest of your customer, you would be doing the same for your business.  You instill loyalty by earning it! 
 
I can say that it doesn’t always work.  In some instances, customers get caught up in the sizzle of the presentation and not the steak, i.e., the coin.  In many cases, one is at a disadvantage if they tell the truth when others lie about everything.  Some people just don’t understand the coin business and feel every certified coin should be priced the same and that there is no difference from one coin to another.  This is refuted in auction records every week!  So, I resign myself to the fact that the customers we have are the ones we are meant to have and I’m thankful for them.

on Friday, 10 June 2016 13:18. Posted in News

Over 200 Years Of Combined Numismatic Experience At Your Disposal.

  June 2016 Issue

A Newsletter By:
Rare Coins of New Hampshire's Logo

My Coin Journey Part XII

By Warren Mills



As I stated in My Coin Journey  Part XI, we had a perfect storm for making money for our clients in 1989.  I recognized that we were right in the middle of a speculative bubble.  So I issued an all-out sell signal.  For a few weeks, we were able to buy hundreds of thousands of dollars of rare coins back from clients for incredible profits.  Talk about a win-win: take your original investment off of the table and roll the profits into under-valued areas.  It worked like clockwork! 
 
Then in the middle of June, I went on vacation and left instructions to keep the ball rolling.  Alas, the owner got cold feet and concocted a story about putting the company in jeopardy.   The buy-back program was stopped on a dime and many people missed the greatest run-up in coin history.  Thankfully, we made many hundreds of people huge money: 2 to 5 times their initial purchase price!

on Tuesday, 03 May 2016 13:11. Posted in News

Over 200 Years Of Combined Numismatic Experience At Your Disposal.

  May 2016 Issue

A Newsletter By:
Rare Coins of New Hampshire's Logo

My Coin Journey Part XI

By Warren Mills



The market upswing from 1987 to 1989 was like the Roaring Twenties of the coin business.  There were brokerage firms offering coins, but not blindly.  They were trying to discern if the coin industry was even worth the time and effort to bother with.  The coin market is so small in comparison to stocks, bonds and currency trading, that there were concerns.  If you spend a few billion dollars, you could suck up virtually the whole certified coin market in one swoop.  If they were trying to get people to diversify out of prudence, what would they do if they can’t fill the orders? 
 
To me, it made sense to view it as a passing fancy and stick with their strength, which they did.  From a numismatist's view, they were in a position of trusting maybe one or two suppliers.  How much due diligence and trust do you put in one or two suppliers?  Suppose there is collusion going on for pricing or some form of misrepresentation in desirability or marketability.  Their exposure wasn’t worth the time involved.  If you look at it from a risk/ reward perspective, the risk was too great to get involved with a small specialty market.

Memberships and Affiliations

        

TOP